Southern Costa Rica

Southern Costa Rica is lovely. DSC_2616

Some 25% of all land in Costa Rica is devoted to National Park. For the most part, Costa Rica was ignored by Spain when part of her empire, and not very developed; furthermore, after a rough but brief civil war in 1949, the country abolished their military. The result has been a great deal of unspoiled country, and the resources to maintain and protect it.

Golfito in the morning

Golfito in the morning

As such, tourism rules the roost, although not the type that is particularly accommodating to scrappy cruisers such as ourselves. There are lots of eco-lodges, several all-inclusive resorts, backpacker facilities and sport fishing marinas. Anchoring out, on the other hand, can be a bit more challenging.

We arrived in Golfito prepared to have everything stolen. The port has a bad reputation for theft, especially of dinghies; in general, for the whole country, cruisers are advised to keep their dinghies out of the water with the outboards locked to the boat in a very visible way. Katie at Land-Sea explained that people see cruisers having their dinghies stolen, and then immediately replaced by insurance companies with brand-new gear, so they think it’s no big deal. Well, it’s a big deal for us, but we’ve already gotten into the habit of keeping things locked up, and we had no problems.

Marinas recommend hiring an agent, to the tune of at $200-$400, to help you check in. Let me tell you straight up, that is BOSH. We had no problems checking in, heading first to the immigration office right near the marinas. The extremely helpful official organized all of our paperwork for us; told us exactly how many copies of which documents we needed from the copy shop down the street; and sent us on to the customs office and port captain with clear instructions. We did have to hire a cab to get between those offices, but $12 for transportation is no big deal, and cab fare and copies were the only things we paid for.

Clean teeth! In Costa Rica, the actual dentist does the cleaning, so you get the full benefit of his opinion about every tooth. We all got a thumbs-up.

Clean teeth! In Costa Rica, the actual dentist does the cleaning, so you get the full benefit of his opinion about every tooth. We all got a thumbs-up.

Golfito itself is pretty scrappy, but after the wilds of Pacific Panama, we were pretty appreciative of luxuries like well-stocked grocery stores and cell service. We set up the new phone; we stocked up on pastry, along with boring items like fruit and lettuce; we got our teeth cleaned; we filled up with water; and we moved on.

Puerto Jiminez. Five feet from the beach, and the water was over their heads.

Puerto Jiminez. Five feet from the beach, and the water was over their heads.

DSCF3040Two relaxing nights at Pureto Jiminez, and we headed for the outside of the Osa Peninsula. The end of a loooong, light-wind, swell-tactic passage found us hovering outside the entrance to Drake’s Bay; we’d just managed to drop and secure the main when we were blasted by a dense squall for which the area is known. The rain was coming down too hard to see past the bow of the boat; we held station right outside the anchorage until things subsided and we could creep in without hitting any of the anchored dive boats or pangas.

Concerns about crocs up the river...

Concerns about crocs up the river…

Drake’s Bay has so many lovely things going for it; not the least of which is a free dinghy dock inside the mouth of a little river. Exploring up the river, we saw capuchin monkeys in the trees and a caiman slip silently into the water. Even better than the short trip up the river are the trails that lead off from the dock; well-maintained paths go along the coast to a number of beaches. It was in Drake’s Bay that we saw scarlet macaws for the first time, and spent a happy hour at the resort by the dock sipping fancy smoothies and watching the birds and iguanas.

Schlepping the SUP to the beach, Drake's Bay

Schlepping the SUP to the beach, Drake’s Bay

The gardens at the resort are so lovely!

The gardens at the resort are so lovely!

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Hike to beach. Repeat as necessary.

Hike to beach. Repeat as necessary.

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Capuchin monkeys hanging out up the river

Capuchin monkeys hanging out up the river

DSCF3079The drawback to Drake’s Bay: swell. It looks so protected on the chart! And yet…those insidious waves manage to creep around the point and knock you about. We also had some pretty wild thunderstorms zip through, including a strong 180-degree shift that knocked our anchor loose around midnight; fortunately, our trusty Mantus reset immediately. After four nights, it was time to move on.

Sunset view from Dominicalito

Sunset view from Dominicalito

When we can, we prefer to hop up a coast, rather than take long passages, so we made for an intermediary stop at Bahia Dominicalito. As expected, the swell found us once again, but this time we decided to take action and set a stern anchor, keeping the bow of our boat pointed into the wind. It worked! We slept well, and work up refreshed and ready for our approach to Manuel Antonio National Park.

That’s when this happened:DSC_2640

Michu attempts to set the stern anchor. Again.

Michu attempts to set the stern anchor. Again.

So already, we were loving all things relating to Manuel Antonio. Staying in the area can be a challenge; choices range from “washing machine anchorage” to “$140-a-night marina.” We tucked out boat just inside Punta Quepos, narrowly dodging a few random, not-well-charted boulders, and managed to get a pretty quiet spot. Once again, we tried our stern anchoring technique, but this time, we failed painfully; the tidal current kept pushing us sideways, messing up the whole system, and we ended up wrapping the stern anchor rode around the rudder. After repeated attempts, we gave up. Still, not so bad; much less rolly than Drake’s Bay, and we were right off a lovely public beach.

My favorite howler monkey picture, actually taken at Bisan Beach and not in the park

My favorite howler monkey picture, actually taken at Bisan Beach and not in the park

Big Al, renter of fine SUPs and kayaks, offered to watch our dinghy the next day, and we caught a cab to Manuel Antonio National Park. Following the advice of pretty much everyone, we hired a guide for the morning, and walked into a zoo without boundaries.

Squirrel monkey.

Squirrel monkey.

Lest you think we were on some kind of isolated, back-country nature safari, let me just clarify: the park was packed. We walked down a road, with service cars; we were never not within sight of at least 20 people—it was a constant stream of humanity, as locals headed to the beach and tourists stuck with their guides. Still, we saw howler, squirrel and capuchin monkeys, as well as a whole bunch of other wildlife pointed out by our guide, George.

Coati, looking for lunch, preferably yours

Coati, looking for lunch, preferably yours

I'm telling you, it's a sloth! Can't you see the claw? The shaggy fur? No?

I’m telling you, it’s a sloth! Can’t you see the claw? The shaggy fur? No?

Jesus Christ lizard, with appropriate beam of light. Also known as a basilisk, so avert your eyes.

Jesus Christ lizard, with appropriate beam of light. Also known as a basilisk, so avert your eyes.

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Totally worth the full tourist experience, and at the end of the day, we were able to head back to our sweet little beach and watch the whales play in the sunset.DSC_2626

A quick update.

In a couple of days, we expect to be ensconced at the Costa Rica Yacht Club, with WiFi, showers, and a pool; we’ll be able to upload all of the fabulous photos we took along the coast, while luxuriating at a level we haven’t seen since Shelter Bay.

In the meantime, we’re enjoying a couple more nights on the hook, exploring beaches and islands up the Bay of Nicoya. The tsunami warnings from the earthquake in Mexico were not for our area; the worst weather we’ve seen has been a couple of evening thunderstorms. We’ve been obsessively following the storms in the Carribean, worrying about friends, but all is calm in Costa Rica.

Michu’s mom is coming for a visit in a little over a week, so pretty soon we’ll have to spring into action and clean up the boat. We’re all looking forward to some actual clean laundry. For the moment, though, we’ll live out a couple of days of relaxation.

Michu tells me that someday we’ll be anchored in a place without a morning wake-up from howler monkeys. I refuse to believe it.

Cost to Cruise: August, 2017

 

Boilerplate disclaimer: this is not what it will cost you to go cruising.

Elvis will sell you a bag of oranges off his tree for three bucks.

Elvis will sell you a bag of oranges off his tree for three bucks.

People’s constant advice, discussing cruising finances, always seems to be: It’ll cost what you have. We did not find this helpful in our planning, however true it may be. What we’re trying to show is the cost to us, more or less, for one month to go cruising. We’re going for monthly expenses, because they’re easier for us to track; so you won’t see the boat insurance amortized, you’ll just see that expense when we pay it. It won’t be what you’ll spend, but it was the kind of information that helped us out when we were trying to wrap our heads around that magical number for our cruising kitty.

Welcome to Costa Rica! The cost of everything here is much higher than in Panama—we were told in a restaurant that people are taxed even to breathe—but we haven’t felt the effects too much yet. September promises to be a bit more costly.

Numbers for August:

Marinas: $50
Grocery: $788.13
Restaurant: $194.65
Supplies: $272.80
Booze: $11.58
Laundry: $61.80
Communications: $162.91
Bank Fees: $1.67
Fuel: $157 diesel; $21.71 stove fuel; $18 dinghy
Water: $3
Customs/Immigration: $64.50
Transportation: $139
Dentist: $192
Grand Total: $2138.75

Notes on the above:

  • We’ve been suffering, and continue to suffer, really rolly anchorages lately. If we can, that means we get off the boat. Hence the increase in restaurant spending.
  • We spent quite a bit of money on transportation to David, and the return trip by cab completely stuffed with groceries. Worth it.
  • Finally got our teeth cleaned in Golfito, for less than $50/person. A bit overdue.
  • Customs and immigration was primarily costly for the convenience of checking out in Boca Chica. Checking in to Costa Rica cost us $4.50 in copies.
  • New SIM card and reboot for the smartphone, so communication expenses were up. At some point, we’re going to have to bump down our level of data for the sat phone, from $125/month to $50; but we still have some remote spots coming up, and I don’t want to risk not getting good weather info.
  • Diesel expenses are way up. Not too much wind over here.

Marine biology lesson

On our way to Manuel Antonio National Park, we came across five or six humpbacks whom we think were bubble net feeding. The result:DSC_2638

In the words of the ten-year-old: it never stops being cool!

Isla Parida and Exeunt

When it comes to checking in and out of the country, Panama can be, shall we say…casual. In some places, they stand at the dock to make sure you’ve left, but many people cruise Panama for a month or more without checking in to the country. We took advantage of this on our way out, and spent a few days in Isla Parida.DSCF2905

There are about 100 people who live on this island, and the whole thing is criss-crossed with hiking trails, taking you from beach to gorgeous beach.DSCF2950

Tree growing right up against the high tide mark

Tree growing right up against the high tide mark

Hermit crab insanity

Hermit crab insanity

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Tree trunk of medieval torture.

Tree trunk of medieval torture.

After a few days on Parida, we crossed the last bit of the Golfo de Chiriqui to anchor just below a wave-deadening reef.

We'll just tuck in behind this massive surf.

We’ll just tuck in behind this massive surf.

On approach to our anchorage, we thought maybe there was a log in the way. No, not a log…maybe a turtle? Yes, a turtle, and it looks like it’s hurt…or tangled up in something? What’s wrong with that turtle?DSC_2669

Oh.

View from the last anchorage in Panama

View from the last anchorage in Panama

Now we’re in Costa Rica, enjoying the fabulous hospitality of Katie at Land-Sea. So far, we’re finding things friendly, expensive, and wet. We don’t plan to stay long in Golfito; we hear there’s less rain up north, and we have family to meet in the Nicoya Peninsula, so we’ll save the zip-lining and rafting until September.

The lovely Land and Sea

The lovely Land-Sea

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