Tropical Storm Nate

So maybe Puntarenas is not the place I would have chosen to spend an entire month, but it’s not too bad.DSCF3284

DSCF3280We’re still cooling our heels a bit as we wait for the end of hurricane season, so we’ve been working on boat projects and trying to regain some routine. Meanwhile, the warm waters of the tropics keep hurling weather around, and we spent a bit of time feeling the effects of Tropical Storm Nate.DSCF3282

Being so far south, there was not much of a chance that we’d encounter Nate as a hurricane, but the storm did dump a whole bunch of water on both the Atlantic and Pacific sides of Costa Rica. Being anchored up the tidal estuary, we were right downstream from all the detritus flowing off the mountains–branches, weeds, sticks, sometimes whole trees.

Here comes a log.

Here comes a log.

On the news, we watched reports of mudslides and bridges washing out. As far as we know, seven people have been reported dead, another dozen missing, and as many as 500 homeless; we hear the damage was worse on the Atlantic side of the country, but we also hear more rain fell on the Pacific side.

When the current from the river lined up with the outgoing tide, the water was a sight to see: furious and dark. The panga drivers in the marina were out for two days straight, pulling rafts off moorings and moving trees out of the way. One boat broke free of its mooring; one dock slid away, with two boats attached. All were recovered without damage, thanks to the panga drivers.

All kinds of stuff jammed up between our boat and the pier, so thick you could walk on it (not recommended). Eventually, the current grew so strong that it pushed al this stuff out.

All kinds of stuff jammed up between our boat and the pier, so thick you could walk on it (not recommended). Eventually, the current grew so strong that it pushed all this stuff out.

Originally, our boat had been tied with our stern facing upriver; back when the current was more mellow, this was no big deal, and it kept the gate on our lifelines accessible to the dock for the Abuelas. As soon as we saw what was happening with the river, however, we spun the Milou around, so our bow could deflect the logs and our prop and rudder would be protected.

Today, the waters have calmed. We’ve some concerns about the channel leaving the Yacht Club–things may have shifted significantly since our entrance; we’re also a bit anxious about all the logs and debris floating around in the bay. Fortunately, we have a friend scoping out the channel today; hopefully we’ll get an “all clear” and be on our way soon.

One of the beautiful trees at the yacht club. Despite dwindling resources, the landscaping around here is still pretty striking.

One of the beautiful trees at the yacht club. Despite dwindling resources, the landscaping around here is still pretty striking.

3 Comments on “Tropical Storm Nate

  1. So glad you’ve managed Hurricane Season so far. Thinking of you often as we cruse the placid waters of Lake Mendoza.

  2. I was thinking of y’all as reports were coming in of Nate forming off Atlantic coast of Costa Rica and affecting both coasts… glad you weathered it well. We almost feel guilty with such beautiful weather in WI… sending our love!
    The uncles.

    • We’ll be throwing it back at you in February, sipping margaritas on a beach in Mazatlan. Miss you guys.

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